#26 02-26-2010 7:27 pm

Kreator
Upright Citizen
From: Wherever I May Roam
Registered: 11-05-2008
Posts: 2560
Karmojo: 42

Re: Animation Exercises

Hey cicco8, I'd say that's lookin' mighty nice so far. The one thing that sticks out is that it seems to lose momentum after it hits the wall. Good work though smile

Offline

 

#27 02-28-2010 6:27 pm

cicco8
Registered: 02-23-2010
Posts: 12

Re: Animation Exercises

tnks for you reply Camaro, i'll try to follow your tips

Offline

 

#28 03-01-2010 10:50 am

franko
Upright Citizen
From: Australia
Registered: 12-04-2007
Posts: 1028
Karmojo: 45

Re: Animation Exercises

I was thinking about this thread recently. I'm a bit too lazy a reader to go back through it all but one thing my animation mentor always said was fun to animate was someone 'lying'.

Where what they say is directly contradicted by their body language and gestures.

Offline

 

#29 03-01-2010 3:31 pm

cicco8
Registered: 02-23-2010
Posts: 12

Re: Animation Exercises

franko wrote:

... was fun to animate was someone 'lying'.

can you explain this easily ?... sorry but my english is very bad

Tnks

Offline

 

#30 03-01-2010 3:42 pm

aeonsteampunk
Model Citizen
From: Scotland
Registered: 02-17-2010
Posts: 46
Karmojo: 52

Re: Animation Exercises

Looking really nice! The first one coming out of the tube looks nice. Maybe a little bit more of an arc if the ball has been fired out. It seems to drop a bit quick to me. Also I have a critcism about the 2nd video. Initially to me it seems a bit weird that the ball suddenly stops dead. I think the ball should keep moving just a little bit more. I don't think it would loose all of its momentum like that. Perhaps overall maybe a little bit more squash and stretch? Even with really realistic bounces like the one you are going for would have maybe a little bit more s n s. I think in animation its always better to be a little bit more exaggerated to get that extra impact across.

Offline

 

#31 03-01-2010 4:49 pm

cicco8
Registered: 02-23-2010
Posts: 12

Re: Animation Exercises

thanks a lot for your help guys, i'll try to make it better following your instruction.

I have not used real references for these, you think I should use and that can help ? And what about planning, You used to planning a bouncing ball ?

thanks again

Offline

 

#32 03-02-2010 8:48 am

franko
Upright Citizen
From: Australia
Registered: 12-04-2007
Posts: 1028
Karmojo: 45

Re: Animation Exercises

cicco8 wrote:

franko wrote:

... was fun to animate was someone 'lying'.

can you explain this easily ?... sorry but my english is very bad

Tnks

...Fun to animate a character being untruthful. Animating a character not telling the truth. Because the character body language communicates the truth while their words deliver the lie.

It's a post for an idea for the subject of the original thread.

I hope it has not being confused as a critique of anyone's work.

Offline

 

#33 03-04-2010 12:23 am

cicco8
Registered: 02-23-2010
Posts: 12

Re: Animation Exercises

i've understood franko. Interesting but i think it's too early for me... i'm in the bouncing ball era wink

tnks for your comment

Offline

 

#34 05-26-2010 1:28 pm

KISHORE
Upstanding Citizen
Registered: 07-18-2008
Posts: 120
Karmojo: 37

Re: Animation Exercises

hi i found this from a link (forgot the sourse) by the here it is from the person who colected  these thanks by the way man

Hey Guys,
Here i gathered a list of animation excercises. This might be a help when you are scratchin your head for "Now what should i Animate??" or for "What do i put in my Animation Reel??". Pick up any of the topics and try your hands on it. We all would love to see the end result. Please add up to the list if you find more.

ANIMATION EXCERCISES:


1) Try to display the emotions a character might go through while waiting for a bus that's late. Pay close attention to facial expressions, body language, and detail.

2) Have a character try to open something (i.e. a present) that refuses to open. The character can only use body parts for the first minute, but may resort to other measures (i.e. tools and explosives) thereafter. Note, the character will be affected by the tools used (i.e. blast of an explosion). After you've mastered this, try to do the same thing with a normally inanimate object (i.e. lamp) as your lead character.

3a) Animate someone riding a pogo stick or some other 'fun' object (i.e. using a hoola hoop).

3b) Have your character use a weighted object, such as a hammer or a shovel. Demonstrate how the weight of the object affects the stance and demeanor of the character using it.

4) Create a walk cycle, then vary it to accommodate different attitudes and 'character'. For example: Angry, happy, sneaky, limping, carrying a heavy object, sleep walking, etc.

5) Animate two characters sawing a log. The first character is a big, muscular brute. Animate him pose-to-pose first and cycle his animation. The second character is a scrawny little guy who gets yanked around, grabbing onto the saw for dear life.

6) Have a character bend down, pick up something heavy, and throw it. This exercise can help you with timing, emphasizing weight, and anticipation.

7) Put a short character in a tall room with one window, one door, one light (and switch) and a hanging ceiling fan (with hanging switch). The room contains 3 boxes, a ball, and a board. Imagine the different ways your character could figure out how to reach the hanging switch and then animate the most outrageous. Next, subtract two boxes and add a skateboard and try again.

From cgTalk:

Bouncing ball (rubber, wood, lead, glass, beach, bowling, tennis, cannon, etc.)

Egg dropping/rolling

Brick dropping

Walk, run, jump (show character from one into the next ? realistic, character, 4-legged)

Lift-carry-put down weight

Climb

Dialogue/monologue where the character starts off feeling one emotion and changes into another

Different weights of characters/ vary the size and shape of the character doing above tasks

Four-legged character (cat, dog, etc.) walking, jumping, climbing, stretching, yawning, scratching, etc.

Juicebox: a juice box enters frame from left has an emotion change throughout the animation and leaves from right (200 frame limit)

Character jumping over object

Character interaction with a ball

Character interaction with a box (push, pull, lift, etc.)

Bring an inanimate object to life

Leaf falling in arcs and the timing

Egg drop / brick drop

Character pushing a box / picking up box

Ringing bell tower bell

Interaction with a box, interaction with a ball

A short dialogue (very short), putting physical accents on the significant beats of dialogue

Two character dialogue - introduces more staging and interaction
Standing or sitting, character doing nothing, body language should suggest thought process without any interaction with an object

A bunch of people waiting for a bus, all with different ages/professions

A character walks to a mailbox, deposits an envelope, and walks away. Now, how is that action different if the envelope contains (1) a heartfelt love letter, sent without knowing whether the recipient feels the same way about the sender, or (2) this year's tax return, which includes a big fat check made payable to Uncle Sam, or (3) the last mortgage payment on a house, or the last alimony check to an ex? The basic goals are the same (approach mailbox, etc), but the motivation behind them and the mood expressed will be dramatically different for each one.
Character goes to pick up an object they think is light but it?s heavy, and vice versa

3 legged character - two legs cannot move in unison

First you come up with something very minor - say, a guy picking up a flower.

Now you start developing context...ask yourselves questions and try to come up with interesting answers

A two legged character walk on all fours

An old man kneeling down to pray, then rising

Pendulum swing (using arcs)

Simple head turn (using arcs)

Water drop falling from a leaf

One-shape character design

Complex character design

Emotional character walk in profile (anticipate - walk two strides and compensate to a stop)

Flour sack walkcycle

Flour sack falling off a ledge

Character waiting for something

Character sitting on object, interacting with object

Circus/Sideshow accidents (character walking on a tightrope gets distracted by a sound off screen, and just loses control; character stuck in a cannon, trying desperately to get out before the fuse burns out, but of course doesn't quite make it; carnie tries to impress onlookers with a "talent" but it goes horribly wrong)

Confrontation between two characters. One is losing but makes a spectacular comeback, just when you thought all hope was lost.  This is that huge fight between the Boss and the Hero, or the dramatic clash that has led up to your dramatic quest Hero/villain attempts to execute their strange and unfamiliar powers. Suddenly something goes horribly wrong and their power backfires

Character tries to access a bank machine and it misbehaves

Character tries to use a restroom and can't

Character takes on a profession as a mover and has to move an awkward object

Character entering a dark corridor/cave with weapon drawn awaiting a surprise from the dark

Character finding the ?one ring? and reacting to his discovery

Show a feat of elven dexterity (ie. Legolas jumping on the horse or walking on snow, etc., but be original)

Character meeting death from an attack

Character thinks they're going to sneeze, then not sneeze and then finally sneezing

Character trying to swat a fly or catch a bug

Character trying to stay awake, finally falls asleep (maybe something really loud wakes him up at the end its up to you)

Character sneaking up on another character to scare them

Character leaning against the wall, chewing gum or a toothpick, hands in his pockets or maybe flipping a coin, waiting for something to happen

Character lifting their leg in front of them (perhaps ballet).  Study the balance of body.

From Spicy Cricket.com:
1. Character on the phone, but not talking, listening to a person on the other end talk about something: important, sad, happy and/or "fill in the blank". Choose the subject matter to really express how the receiver of that information reacts. The exercise is designed to help people develop a character's thinking through eye movement, subtle facial expression and pantomime with body language.

2. Display the feelings a character would experience while waiting for something or someone. Gender specific reactions can be really revealing here. How a man would react vs. a woman? This is a good exercise because it demands pure acting outside of dialogue. Much like Tom Hanks for most of castaway, your character will need to show lots of emotion through psychological gesture.

3. Create a walk cycle. Now make 4 variations on the same character to illustrate an emotion. For example: Angry Stomp, Happy Run, Sad Shuffle, Cocky Strut, Questioning Tiptoe, etc. Be sure to refer to the bouncing ball for your arcs and paths on this one.

4. Create a walk cycle with a four legged character. Do the same thing as above, but now illustrate you ability to translate it into four legs or even an insect and go to six or eight legs. Always refer to real life and then translate that into your own work. It is great when you can create a connection between an animal and human nature, but if you keep the integrity of the animal's basic essence, then the animation will be much richer. Of course a dog would not have the emotional range of a human, but you still know when a dog is happy. Think to yourself, not only how a human might react to the situation, but also how "insert animal/creature here" would react to it also.

5. Character encounters something that he wants to open. Perhaps it has difficulty opening it. Perhaps it reacts to whatever it opens (but you don't see what it in it). The character can only use body parts for the first 30 seconds, but may pursue some other means (i.e. tools and explosives) thereafter. This one is really open ended and can test your ability to show many storytelling ideas in the body language and facial expressions, without one line of dialogue.

6. A similar test to the one above is to have a witch attempt to ride a broom that keeps bucking her off. Andreas Deja (animated--Jafar in Aladdin, Scar in Lion King, Gaston in B & B, etc.) spoke of this test at a talk I attended in LA. He referred to it as what Disney asked him to do before he was officially brought into the animation department.

7. Animate two characters sawing a log. The first character is a big, macho man. Animate him pose-to-pose first holding one side of the saw and cycle his animation. The second character is a scrawny little guy who gets yanked around, grabbing onto the saw for dear life. This idea would be even better if there was some kind of big finish where the little guy gets the best of the big guy.

8. A character lifts something heavy. This is hard enough to show shifts in weight throughout the body to get leverage, but if you wanted to make the test even more complicated you can make the character do something else, while continuing to hold the heavy object. Great example of weight and timing. Again, Chapter 3 in The Illusion of Life covers this concept thoroughly.

9. A character is doing something and needs to get someone's attention. Lots of eye movement and subtle mouth stuff, as well as body language on an exercise like this.

10. The flour sack. A great test that forces understanding of the principles in its most basic form. Make a four sack move and react to show emotions and character. Be sure to remember the volume of the sack and how it would move between contact with the ground and being airborne. This test is a favorite among animators, since there is very little character design and development and you really have to pay attention to what you are trying to communicate.

From AWN:
What folks in the industry want to see is...character animation.  THINKING, BREATHING CHARACTERS!  Do 15-30 seconds of GREAT CHARACTER ANIMATION with one or two characters which show the following:

WEIGHT - show weight by squashing the feet and in the quads of the upper legs (on the front side) and in the hips/butt area.  In 3D - use a lattice when structuring your character. WHEN IN DOUBT EXAGGERATE THE WEIGHT.

Posing with exaggeration

ACTIONS - LEADING AND FOLLOWING actions are easy - example: when a character land one foot makes contact and then the other...or if you lift the arms - one arm goes up and then the other.

OVERLAPPING ACTIONS - example the character comes to a halt and her hair and dress continue to flow and settle into place. To be effective the overlapping has to use "S" curves to change direction.

DRAG ACTION - is where you show a drag on a form as it moves through space. This usually occurs at the ends of the form. If a rubber raft is falling, the middle edge will be intact - the other edges will bend or drag back.

MOTIVATIONAL FORCES - what makes thing move - 80% or more of all actions happen because of the hips and legs. If a character throws a ball the action starts with the extension (unfolding) of the front leg which rotates the hips and create toque with the torso and allows the unwinding of the torso to lead the shoulder and the rest of the arm through a throwing motion.  Another example: a character can't turn unless he pushes off on the outside foot - then he can change direction.

Thinking time (a character ALWAYS thinks before it does anything).

PRIMARY AND SECONDARY ACTIONS - easy example in a walk - the legs are the primary action - then arms are the secondary action.

ANTICIPATION - (or ANTIC) In a grab, the hand comes up and backward before it goes forward.

COMPENSATION - If a character is running and stops - you have to compensate for the forward momentum (usually by driving the forces up - or down and then up.)

REVERSALS - try to work as many reversals into the spine as possible (as long as it makes sense to the action). The spine is curved forward - then curves back during an antic and then curves forward when the character picks up a stone. HINT: My next lesson at the Toon Institute will have this information.

A CUSHION OR SETTLE is where you move passed a key frame into an extreme/extreme and then cushion back into the original key frame.

A MOVING HOLD is a very, very slow slow-out of an action - to where the movement is coming to a creeping halt.

Staging (how the action is composed within the frame)

Character Design - the ability to caricature a person utilizing good design skills and have appeal



Here i found some more on 3dArk.com -

1) Try to display the emotions a character might go through while waiting for a bus that's late. Pay close attention to facial expressions, body language, and detail.

2) Have a character try to open something (i.e. a present) that refuses to open. The character can only use body parts for the first minute, but may resort to other measures (i.e. tools and explosives) thereafter. Note, the character will be affected by the tools used (i.e. blast of an explosion). After you've mastered this, try to do the same thing with a normally inanimate object (i.e. lamp) as your lead character.

3a) Animate someone riding a pogo stick or some other 'fun' object (i.e. using a hoola hoop).

3b) Have your character use a weighted object, such as a hammer or a shovel. Demonstrate how the weight of the object affects the stance and demeanor of the character using it.

4) Create a walk cycle, then vary it to accommodate different attitudes and 'character'. For example: Angry, happy, sneaky, limping, carrying a heavy object, sleep walking, etc.

5) Animate two characters sawing a log. The first character is a big, muscular brute. Animate him pose-to-pose first and cycle his animation. The second character is a scrawny little guy who gets yanked around, grabbing onto the saw for dear life.

6) Have a character bend down, pick up something heavy, and throw it. This exercise can help you with timing, emphasizing weight, and anticipation.

7) Put a short character in a tall room with one window, one door, one light (and switch) and a hanging ceiling fan (with hanging switch). The room contains 3 boxes, a ball, and a board. Imagine the different ways your character could figure out how to reach the hanging switch and then animate the most outrageous. Next, subtract two boxes and add a skateboard and try again.


Hope they help you to practise animation and to get some topics for your reel.






OLLIE JOHNSTON NOTES

"Twelve Rules for Expression"

(1) Guidelines for showing the expression change:

(a) Avoid making a fast body move while changing the expression.
(b) Change your expression before or after the body move.
(c) Don't lose the expresison change in an active secondary action. Eg. clothing catching up with body move.

(2) Don't try to tell too much in one drawing. Work out the idea over a series of drawings.

(3) Don't let facial expressions conflict with dialogue: The idea behind the words should suggest expression.

(4) Be sure you have the right staging to show all the expression in your scene to best advantage:
- Long Shot, medium shot, close up.
- Straight-on, 3/4, Bird's eye, + Worm's eye views.

(5) Have you the right expression to show what your character is thinking? Are all the parts of the head & face related to this one idea?

(6) The expression of the idea behind the words must be captured throught the whole body as well as in the face. But remember: that expression originates in the eyes.

(7) It is the change of shape of the eyes that shows what the character is thinking, It is the thinking that gives the illusion of life.

(8) Avoid looking up (worm's eye view) for a frown unless it is a sinister domineering frown.

(9) Don't hide a smile with the head tilted down too far, or behind a big nose or moustache.

(10) Eyes in close-up should move 3 FRS ahead of accent.

(11) In a blink, eyes should close 3-4 FRS ahead of accent.

(12) Always remember: in character animation, all the different parts of the charcter - head, eyes, mouth, body & limbs, clothing -start & stop at different times, & move at different rates. This means you, the animator, must separate spacing charts for the different parts -example, one for the eyes, one for the mouth, one for the eyebrows, etc - on keays. Bear in mind that key for one part may also be an inbetween for another part: in other words, the starts & stops for different actions will overlap.


KEEP MOVING FORWARD --- Walt Disney

SKI

Offline

 

#35 05-26-2010 3:03 pm

samtemment
Participator
From: china
Registered: 04-21-2010
Posts: 17
Karmojo: 8

Re: Animation Exercises

helpful ,thanks


u never know until u try!

Offline

 

#36 05-26-2010 4:22 pm

Kreator
Upright Citizen
From: Wherever I May Roam
Registered: 11-05-2008
Posts: 2560
Karmojo: 42

Re: Animation Exercises

Holy cow - guess I have some editing to do! Nice work Kishore!

Offline

 

#37 05-26-2010 5:18 pm

paulnaas
Model Citizen
From: The left coast...
Registered: 10-11-2007
Posts: 243
Karmojo: 55

Re: Animation Exercises

evilanimator_13 wrote:

hello guys ! theres an exercise called Standing up ! I tried it , your feedback would be really appereciated ,this is my first ever animated short ! please do comment !

Direct Link




Thank you guys smile  please do ctique, it'd be really kind of you . & please do rate this on youtube too smile U may comment too. Thank u very much smile

Happy Animating smile

Is he pushing himself up with his arms, or simply standing up from a sitting position?  I can't quite tell.  If he's pushing up, he needs to get his hips over his feet before he lets go with his hands.  If he's just standing up, he needs to get his weight over his feet before standing.  The head antic is nice, but it implies that he's standing up without the aide of his hands, so lean him forward and get his mass over his feet.

Offline

 

#38 05-27-2010 7:41 pm

FriendyAnil
Registered: 05-27-2010
Posts: 2

Re: Animation Exercises

Our track team does stadiums for the thighs and butts. We run up to the top of the college football stadium and walk down fast. Takes about a week to notice, do it nightly about an hour. Take a break when pulse rises. Stomach, don't drink sodas, do sit ups nightly, maybe 75 in the morning, 75 in the afternoon, 75 at night. results I have no idea how long.

Offline

 

#39 05-31-2010 2:21 am

Droo
From: Singapore
Registered: 05-25-2010
Posts: 578

Re: Animation Exercises

cicco8 wrote:

This is my first test about bouncing ball + wall
Can someone tell me what should i improve ?
Thanks

I think you can afford to have your ball in the 2nd clip bounce a couple more times. At the moment, the bounce seems to die out a bit too quickly.


Check out my animations at Deadpan-Entertainment.com
Or read some geeky nonsense at Revo-Emag.com!

Offline

 

#40 06-04-2010 6:16 pm

Figlesiase
From: Mexico
Registered: 06-02-2010
Posts: 3

Re: Animation Exercises

Thanks for posting these, mate. I'll try and do 'em all.
But it certainly helps to have a list proper.

Offline

 

#41 12-17-2010 1:01 pm

creative.stinger
Celebrity
From: India
Registered: 08-21-2010
Posts: 262
Karmojo: 60

Re: Animation Exercises

super awesome.. smile


Learning to Fly....

Offline

 

#42 12-18-2010 1:24 am

Crayon10
Registered: 11-20-2010
Posts: 144

Re: Animation Exercises

I have noticed that in all these list that there is not division of difficulty as in going from basic to advance. Even if the model is simple primitive some of the exercises look a little complex.

Offline

 

#43 01-10-2011 6:49 pm

animator007
Registered: 12-27-2010
Posts: 6

Re: Animation Exercises

great!!!!!!!!!! list thanks a lot.

Offline

 

#44 01-10-2011 9:42 pm

VickyAnimation
Model Citizen
From: Cordoba, Argentina
Registered: 08-29-2010
Posts: 87
Karmojo: 55

Re: Animation Exercises

Theres one of the principles of animation that maybe you have to use it a little bit more: squash and stretch. Its one of the most important principles in animation, you have to have it always in mind. When the ball reaches the floor you have to squash it, when the ball takes off you have to stretch it and when it reaches the highest point the ball rest in its normal position. As the ball loses force you can make the squash and stretch smaller.
I hope this helped a little!
Keep going

Offline

 

#45 03-20-2011 11:27 am

puneetritehere
Tipster
Registered: 03-13-2011
Posts: 1
Karmojo: 27

Re: Animation Exercises

hey guys this is my assignment on bouncing ball.. please tell me if you like it or whatever needs to be improved.

heres the link: please watch it from a realistic point of view. not cartoony. thks smile

Direct Link

Last edited by puneetritehere (03-20-2011 11:28 am)

Offline

 

#46 03-20-2011 2:38 pm

robcat2075
Celebrity
From: Dallas TX
Registered: 08-01-2008
Posts: 2340
Karmojo: 68

Re: Animation Exercises

It's hard to crit bouncing ball without being able to scrub through it but the movement of the yellow ball looks odd, as if it were sticking to the surfaces it hits.


"3D animators have pencil envy" - Robert Holmén
The world's most beloved Heavy Push
This is only a... my gallery of CG tests
I'm a 2D Wannabe...  drawings and 2D animation tests

Offline

 

#47 03-20-2011 5:07 pm

Stina
Celebrity
From: Stockholm, Sweden
Registered: 06-11-2010
Posts: 554
Karmojo: 63
Moderator

Re: Animation Exercises

I think the yellow ball should bounce a lot more. It's pretty unnatural how it makes two somewhat big bounces and then just rolls off. So add a little bounce on the way down, and maybe a little bounce back when it hits the wall (instead of going straight to the side) and it will look a lot better.


Stuff I made: www.stinaboberg.com
Days gone without mentioning knees: Not many.

Offline

 

#48 03-21-2011 8:14 pm

Vrednia
Upright Citizen
Registered: 11-01-2009
Posts: 257
Karmojo: 42

Re: Animation Exercises

challenge accepted!!!

Offline

 

#49 09-10-2011 7:30 pm

cjgallagher
Tipster
Registered: 09-05-2011
Posts: 13
Karmojo: 28

Re: Animation Exercises

Great lists! I saved most of these into a doc and look em up whenever I want a challenge, love em! Here's my pogo jump one, it's just a block i made this morning, took maybe an hour? Probably not even that haha here it is:

Direct Link

Last edited by cjgallagher (09-10-2011 7:31 pm)

Offline

 

#50 09-10-2011 8:40 pm

Alle
Celebrity
From: today Vancouver.. tomorrow...?
Registered: 06-13-2007
Posts: 281
Karmojo: 64

Re: Animation Exercises

Welcome's to the jungles!
My suggestions: keep longer the movie, now it is too short, wink maybe you can keep in loop for 4 sec . And also if you can add the file in .mov will be great! wink

Alle

Offline

 

Board footer

Powered by PunBB
© Copyright 2002–2005 Rickard Andersson